Category: ANCESTRY

Dred Scott And His Fight For Freedom (1799 – 1858)

Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857 Popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision” Dred Scott was an enslaved African in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife and their two daughters in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857, popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision”. […]

Jackie Robinson, Baseball Hall of Fame Player (1919 – 1972)

An amazing American professional baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the modern era. Robinson  broke the color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. Jackie Robinson’s life & legacy will be remembered as one of the most important in Baseball […]

Wovoka, Ghost Dance Northern Paiute Medicine Man (1856 – 1932)

Wovoka (c. 1856 – September 20, 1932), also known as Jack Wilson, was a Northern Paiute Medicine Man who founded the Ghost Dance movement. Prophet Wodziwob, another Northern Paiute is believed to be the first to introduce the Ghost Dance rituals around 1869. Wovoka is the chief figure that reintroduced the movement in 1889. Wovoka means “cutter” or […]

Te Ata Fisher, Native Actress and Storyteller (1895 – 1995)

Te Ata Thompson or Te Ata Fisher after her marriage, was a superb actress and member of the Chickasaw Nation. Known for telling American Indian stories, she performed as a representative of American Indians at state dinners before President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s. She was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in […]

Author Mourning Dove aka Christal Quintasket (1888 – 1936)

Mourning Dove aka Christal Quintasket (1888 – August 6, 1936) was a Salish author and best known for her 1927 novel “Cogewea the Half-Blood: A Depiction of the Great Montana Cattle Range” It tells the story of Cogewea, a mixed-blood ranch woman on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Mourning Dove was born in a canoe on the Kootenai […]

The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

by William Loren Katz Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans — considered unneeded inferior or criminal — a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors of good will. Sacajawea, […]

Targeted Courthouse Fires in Amerikkka?

Why were there so many courthouse fires in America in the 18th and 19th centuries? Those “oh so frequent” county court house fires in buildings that seems to have suffered from bouts of spontaneous combustion. The same government buildings that contained land deeds, marriage, birth record, and anything on paper that identifies us legally as […]

An Ancient Seminole Christmas Gift: Freedom (1837)

by William Loren Katz adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition  On Christmas day 1837, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior US invading army bent on cracking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery. The Seminole victory stands as a milestone […]

Largest Mass Hanging Execution in US History (1862)

Remembering 38 + 2 Dakota Ancestors Their trials were conducted unfairly in a variety of ways. They were executed at Mankato, Minnesota on December 26, 1862 in the largest mass hanging in U.S. history. This day after Christmas is somber for Dakota American Indians marking a travesty of justice over 150 years ago, when 38+2 of […]

Wilmington Massacre, North Carolina, Nov. 10, 1898

Writings of Charles H. Williams Library of the Wisconsin State Historical Society Madison American Terrorism at its finest…The Wilmington Massacre of 1898 was a bloody attack on the African-American community by a heavily armed white mob with the support of the North Carolina Democratic Party on November 10, 1898 in the port city of Wilmington, […]

Truth of The Bear River Massacre in Washington Territory (1863)

In memory of the victims of the Bear River Massacre January 29, 1863. Washington Territory The peaceful Shoshone camp was attacked at dawn by Colonel Patrick Edward O’Connor and his militia from Salt Lake City, UT. The Bear River camp was in Washington Territory. Not even a part of the territory O’Connor was sent to watch […]
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