Topic: Slavery

Dangerfield Newby, The Real Django (1815 – 1859)

Dangerfield Newby, The Real Django (1815 – 1859) was the oldest of John Brown‘s raiders, one of five black raiders, and the first of his men to die at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Born as enslaved African in Fauquier County, Virginia, Newby married a woman also enslaved. Newby was later freed by his Scottish father, but […]

John Horse, Wild Cat, Cross-cultural Freedom Partners

“Cross-cultural Freedom Partners” by Linda Cousins-Newton, The Ancestral Storyteller. John Horse (1812 –1882), African & Seminole, Wild Cat (1810 – 1857), Seminole. The great Bahamian folk singer, Ronnie Butler relates in one of his popular numbers, “I know these people long time. These people are mine”; he goes on to musically declare that these people […]

Watch Night Service, Liberation History, December 31,1862

Celebrating the Emancipation Proclamation. The roots of Watch Night Service (December 31, 1862) celebrated in many Black American communities nationwide are founded in enslaved African and liberation history. On midnight, Dec. 31, 1862, the New Year was ushered in by enslaved Africans watching and praying for news that Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation had become law. On […]

Black and Red Seminoles, A Proud Matriarchal Society

Estilustis and Estecates – Florida’s Black and Red Cowboys, Cattle Herders, and Underground Railroad Conductors of the South. Long before Florida was a U. S. state, it was home to diverse freedom seekers who found refuge from slavery, established thriving communities and prospered on Florida’s frontier. Florida’ original inhabitants were southeastern American Indians who had […]

Declaration of Independence. The 4th of July, 1776

The Declaration of Independence is a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776 Which announced that the thirteen American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. Instead they formed a union that would become a new nation—the United […]

Reconsider Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day

Reconsider Columbus Day to Indigenous People’s Day! Columbus Day marks not a day of discovery, but the beginning of hundreds of years of horrific genocide, not just for indigenous communities but also for other communities of color with whom native history is profoundly entwined. “Columbus Day” was made a federal holiday in 1934, when Native […]

George White, African Native American in Congress (1852 – 1918)

“GEORGE H. WHITE” by William Loren Katz The first Black Indian to serve in Congress. The United States among nations of the world can claim some kind of a prize for its ability to ignore some of its most daring and brave historical figures – if they are people of color. The first Black Indian […]

John Brown, A White Role Model and True Hero (1800 – 1859)

John Brown: A White Role Model by William Loren Katz John Brown was born in 1800, and he was executed by the state of Virginia  on December 2, 1859. This year (2006) a PBS documentary film continued an effort that began even before his execution to sully his reputation. Why? He was a white man who […]

Rarely Told History of Native American Indian Slavery

It is not known how many Indians were enslaved by the Europeans, but they certainly numbered in the tens of thousands.  It is estimated that Carolina merchants operating out of Charles Town shipped an estimated 30,000 to 50,000 Indian captives between 1670 and 1715. This was a very profitable slave trade with the Caribbean, Spanish […]

The Lowry Band Of North Carolina

by William Loren Katz Adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition.  People of African and Native American descent have played a prominent part in North Carolina history since survivors of the Lost Colony of Roanoke in 1585 found a home among the nearby Lumbee Indians and then took in runaway slaves from […]

Dred Scott And His Fight For Freedom (1799 – 1858)

Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857 Popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision” Dred Scott was an enslaved African in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife and their two daughters in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857, popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision”. […]

Targeted Courthouse Fires in Amerikkka?

Why were there so many courthouse fires in America in the 18th and 19th centuries? Those “oh so frequent” county court house fires in buildings that seems to have suffered from bouts of spontaneous combustion. The same government buildings that contained land deeds, marriage, birth record, and anything on paper that identifies us legally as […]

An Ancient Seminole Christmas Gift: Freedom (1837)

by William Loren Katz adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition  On Christmas day 1837, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior US invading army bent on cracking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery. The Seminole victory stands as a milestone […]
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