Change The Mascot Name of the NFL Washington Team!

Change the Mascot

Take action today to urge the NFL Washington team to change the mascot name

Contact your local newspapers, Radio and TV stations to speak out against the NFL Washington Redsk*ns name. Write to NFL League Commissioner Roger Goodell and ask for the Washington franchise to change the mascot. Tweet Commissioner Goodell @nflcommish with the following hashtags #ChangeTheMascot – #NotYourMascot – #ChangeTheName.

CONTACT DETAILS: 345 Park Ave., New York, NY 10154 – NFL League Office: (212) 450-2000

 

Why is The Term Redsk*ns Harmful to Native Peoples?

To many American Indians, the term “Redsk*ns” is associated with the barbaric practice of scalping. The record in this case is replete with evidence of bounty proclamations issued by the colonies and companies. These proclamations demonstrate that the term “Redsk*ns” had its origins in the commodification of Indian skins and body parts; these “Redsk*ns” were required as proof of Indian kill in order for bounty hunters to receive payment and these skins of genitalia (to differentiate the skins of women and children from men, in order for bounty payers to pay on a sliding scale for the exact dead Indian) were referred to as scalps (while hair from the head was referred to as top-knots).

“The use of American Indian mascots as symbols in school and university athletic programs is particularly troubling. Schools and universities are places of learning. These mascots are teaching stereotypical, misleading and, too often, insulting images of American Indians. And these negative lessons are not just affecting American Indian students; they are sending the wrong message to all students.” ~Ronald F. Levant, Former President of the American Psychological Association

 

change the mascot

Change the Mascot Name Video Playlist

 

 

“Kill The Man, Save The Indian” by Kerry Hawk Lessard

You may be forgiven for thinking that discourse surrounding the Washington DC football team is about mascots, but it isn’t. Not solely. This is not merely about a team’s name or its owner’s right to trademark it. It’s not about cherry-picked “facts”, outdated linguistic research, ego-driven pronouncements, or even Original American blood money. This is about structural violence. This is about racism and inequality, forced assimilation and cultural appropriation. This is about how images and words function as weapons of degradation within the real lives of Native people. This is about the ability to claim one’s own identity without it being negated and invalidated at every turn. This about staring down the barrel of genocide and surviving.

Ultimately, this is about a very complex system of events coalescing around loss. Loss of land and of language, loss of kinship and culture, loss of agency and sense of self. Loss of the right to say who we are and who we are destined to be. For successive generations, depictions not unlike those found at the center of the mascot debate have defined our people to the non-Indian world. We are continuously re-imagined by forces over which we not only lack control but over which we are denied control. And every diminution and act of micro-aggression, whether by lampoon or cultural theft, exacerbates the experience of historic trauma. They are daily papercuts that over time become gaping wounds whose flow of blood is slow to stem. And in terms of the health and wellness of our people, we are hemorrhaging.

No, this goes way beyond offense. The contumacy and hubris of Snyder, the NFL, and team supporters continues an historical pattern of sublimating the indigenous voice and its priorities. These entities assume an incontrovertible authority to tell Native people what should or should not define us, what we should or should not hold sacred, and that we must accept their slurs as honor not because they say it is so. Ultimately, they take from us the sovereign right to identify ourselves and our human potential, commodifying our images, our cultures, and our personhood. (And profiting nicely, too.) With all respect, it is not for non-Natives to tell us what we should think about these things. That is for us to determine. Genocide and the deep scars of colonization are not something you “get over.”

So this is why I plead with you. Please stop saying mascots are offensive. To center complaint with such a limited claim undercuts the argument and renders it much weaker than it really is. Just the word “offense” sanitizes the inherently violent nature of the symbolism embedded within mascots and the social structures that allow them to exist virtually uncontested in dominant society. It gives tacit permission to those already committed to dismissing us that we are too indulgent of our own weak feelings. These words and images are not simply offensive. They are a celebration of ethnic cleansing, colonialism, racial superiority, and romantic nationalism. That’s more than just offensive. It’s dehumanizing. And it needs to end, starting with the DC football team and its name.

“I’m a human being, I’m not anyone’s mascot! And I am America’s conscience. And that’s what they don’t want to look at. They would rather look at a cartoon character than at the deceit of this country and this government.” ~Russell Means, Oglala Lakota

 

Change the name 


SOURCE: Compiled by I Love Ancestry. Including a statement compiled from a message by Kerry Hawk Lessard “Kill The Man, Save The Indian”

I Love Ancestry is a global issue advocacy campaign that explores identity, diversity, heritage and culture, highlighting the experiences of marginalized people and Indigenous communities around the world.

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