Topic: Native American Ancestor

Silent Film, All-Native Cast: The Daughter of Dawn (1920)

Videos of Silent Film With All-Native Cast including Wanada Parker, daughter of Chief Quannah Parker. “The Daughter of Dawn” (1920), a silent film featuring an all-Native cast came to be made, lost seemingly forever, was discovered nearly a century later (in shambles), then restored and shown to the cast’s descendants. It sure is one of […]

Lament for Confederation Speech by Chief Dan George (1967)

On The Dominion of Canada’s 100th birthday, July 1, 1967 Chief Dan George silenced a crowd of 32,000 with his “Lament for Confederation” speech at Empire Stadium, Vancouver BC. Chief Dan George, was an inspiring author, poet, Academy Award-nominated actor and a chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, a Coast Salish band located on Burrard Inlet […]

Hominy Indians Defeat New York Giants, December 26, 1927

The Hominy Indians were an all-Native American professional football team, meaning The Real Americans, located in Hominy, Oklahoma. The financiers were from Hominy – the players were from all over. On December 26, 1927, they defeated the National Football League New York Giants who were titled world champions three weeks prior. The Hominy Indians shot […]

Wovoka, Ghost Dance Northern Paiute Medicine Man (1856 – 1932)

Wovoka (c. 1856 – September 20, 1932), also known as Jack Wilson, was a Northern Paiute Medicine Man who founded the Ghost Dance movement. Prophet Wodziwob, another Northern Paiute is believed to be the first to introduce the Ghost Dance rituals around 1869. Wovoka is the chief figure that reintroduced the movement in 1889. Wovoka means “cutter” or […]

Te Ata Fisher, Native Actress and Storyteller (1895 – 1995)

Te Ata Thompson or Te Ata Fisher after her marriage, was a superb actress and member of the Chickasaw Nation. Known for telling American Indian stories, she performed as a representative of American Indians at state dinners before President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1930s. She was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in […]

The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

by William Loren Katz Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans — considered unneeded inferior or criminal — a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors of good will. Sacajawea, […]

Targeted Courthouse Fires in Amerikkka?

Why were there so many courthouse fires in America in the 18th and 19th centuries? Those “oh so frequent” county court house fires in buildings that seems to have suffered from bouts of spontaneous combustion. The same government buildings that contained land deeds, marriage, birth record, and anything on paper that identifies us legally as […]

Largest Mass Hanging Execution in US History (1862)

Remembering 38 + 2 Dakota Ancestors Their trials were conducted unfairly in a variety of ways. They were executed at Mankato, Minnesota on December 26, 1862 in the largest mass hanging in U.S. history. This day after Christmas is somber for Dakota American Indians marking a travesty of justice over 150 years ago, when 38+2 of […]
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