Topic: African Native American Ancestor

Edmonia Lewis, Haitian and Ojibwe Sculptor (1844 – 1907)

Mary Edmonia Lewis was a talented American sculptor of African/Haitian and Ojibwe heritage. (July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) She is the first credited African Native American female sculptor in the U.S. Lewis who gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. Lewis was inspired by the lives of abolitionists and […]

Diana Fletcher, African Native American School Teacher

Diana Fletcher (1838 – ?) is thought to be the daughter of an enslaved African who ran away to seek freedom in Florida, and a Seminole woman who died on “The Trail of Tears,” the forced relocation of American Indians to Oklahoma. It is said that she was separated from her father, once in Oklahoma, […]

George Crum (Speck), The Real Inventor of Potato Chips

Honoring George Crum, born George Speck (1828 – 1914), of African and Native American Indian heritage. Every time a person crunches into a potato chip, he or she is enjoying the delicious taste of one of the world’s most famous snacks – a treat that might not exist without the contribution of Afro Native inventor(s) George […]

Moulin Rouge America’s First Interracial Casino (1955)

The Moulin Rouge Casino and the rise of Historic Westside Las Vegas by Rose Davis, Indian Voices. Although the doors were only opened six months America’s first interracial casino was on the front line of the racial struggle in America. The Moulin Rouge Casino is one of the most important casinos in history in helping […]

James Beckwourth, A Mountain Man to Know

“James P. Beckwourth” Apr. 6, 1798 – Oct. 29, 1866 by William Loren Katz James “Jim” Beckwourth emerges from the fur trade’s early history as “the greatest Indian fighter of his generation.” This was an age when his competitors were Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett, Jim Bridger, and Kit Carson. In skill, accomplishment, and violence, he […]

Lucy Gonzales Parsons: A Woman For All Seasons (1853 – 1942)

Lucy Gonzales Parsons A woman for all seasons by William Loren Katz (c. 1853 – Mars 7, 1942) A dynamic, militant, self-educated public speaker and writer, she became the first American woman of color to carry her crusade for socialism across the country and overseas. Lucy Gonzales started life in Texas. She was of Mexican […]

George White, African Native American in Congress (1852 – 1918)

“GEORGE H. WHITE” by William Loren Katz The first Black Indian to serve in Congress. The United States among nations of the world can claim some kind of a prize for its ability to ignore some of its most daring and brave historical figures – if they are people of color. The first Black Indian […]

Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage by William Loren Katz

William Loren Katz is the author of Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage  His books have won awards and his research, writing and lectures have earned widespread praise from noted scholars such as John Hope Franklin, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., John Henrik Clarke, Howard Zinn, James M. McPherson, Alice Walker, Cornel West, Ivan Van Sertima, Betty […]

The Lowry Band Of North Carolina

by William Loren Katz Adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition.  People of African and Native American descent have played a prominent part in North Carolina history since survivors of the Lost Colony of Roanoke in 1585 found a home among the nearby Lumbee Indians and then took in runaway slaves from […]

The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

by William Loren Katz Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans — considered unneeded inferior or criminal — a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors of good will. Sacajawea, […]

Targeted Courthouse Fires in Amerikkka?

Why were there so many courthouse fires in America in the 18th and 19th centuries? Those “oh so frequent” county court house fires in buildings that seems to have suffered from bouts of spontaneous combustion. The same government buildings that contained land deeds, marriage, birth record, and anything on paper that identifies us legally as […]
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