Topic: African American Ancestor

Tuskegee Institute and Tuskegee Airmen, World War II

Remembering the “Tuskegee Airmen” during World War II and all who were involved in the so-called “Tuskegee Experiment”, the Army Air Corps program to train Black Americans to fly and maintain combat aircraft. The Tuskegee Airmen included pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff, instructors, and all the personnel who kept the planes in the […]

Moulin Rouge America’s First Interracial Casino (1955)

The Moulin Rouge Casino and the rise of Historic Westside Las Vegas by Rose Davis, Indian Voices. Although the doors were only opened six months America’s first interracial casino was on the front line of the racial struggle in America. The Moulin Rouge Casino is one of the most important casinos in history in helping […]

Paul Robeson, An American Trail Blazer (1898 – 1976)

“Paul Robeson at 100 years” Apr. 9, 1898 – Jan. 23, 1976 by William Loren Katz On April 9, 1898 Paul Robeson was born to a family steeped in resistance. His father had escaped from slavery. Young Robeson grew to be a majestic figure in the United States, beginning at Rutgers as an all-star athlete, then […]

John Brown, A White Role Model and True Hero (1800 – 1859)

John Brown: A White Role Model by William Loren Katz John Brown was born in 1800, and he was executed by the state of Virginia  on December 2, 1859. This year (2006) a PBS documentary film continued an effort that began even before his execution to sully his reputation. Why? He was a white man who […]

Lamar Smith, Voting Rights Activist (1892 – 1955)

Lamar “Ditney” Smith was murdered in Mississippi (1892 – August 13, 1955) One of many unsung heroes who died so we could vote…Lamar Smith, a 63 year old farmer, World War II veteran, voting rights activist and a member of the Regional Counsel of Negro Leadership was shot dead on the courthouse lawn in Brookhaven, Mississippi […]

Dred Scott And His Fight For Freedom (1799 – 1858)

Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857 Popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision” Dred Scott was an enslaved African in the United States who unsuccessfully sued for his freedom and that of his wife and their two daughters in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case of 1857, popularly known as “The Dred Scott Decision”. […]

Jackie Robinson, Baseball Hall of Fame Player (1919 – 1972)

An amazing American professional baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the modern era. Robinson  broke the color line when the Brooklyn Dodgers started him at first base on April 15, 1947. Jackie Robinson’s life & legacy will be remembered as one of the most important in Baseball […]

The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

by William Loren Katz Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans — considered unneeded inferior or criminal — a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors of good will. Sacajawea, […]

Targeted Courthouse Fires in Amerikkka?

Why were there so many courthouse fires in America in the 18th and 19th centuries? Those “oh so frequent” county court house fires in buildings that seems to have suffered from bouts of spontaneous combustion. The same government buildings that contained land deeds, marriage, birth record, and anything on paper that identifies us legally as […]

Wilmington Massacre, North Carolina, Nov. 10, 1898

Writings of Charles H. Williams Library of the Wisconsin State Historical Society Madison American Terrorism at its finest…The Wilmington Massacre of 1898 was a bloody attack on the African-American community by a heavily armed white mob with the support of the North Carolina Democratic Party on November 10, 1898 in the port city of Wilmington, […]
Join the circle
I Love Ancestry eNews