Preserving the memories of the past in stories and videos of African Native American history, African American History and Native American history: American Historical Truth. Celebrate the shared memories going back from Colonial Period through the 19th Century and 20th century in American history and the struggle for freedom.

YoNasDa Lonewolf Hill "Queen YoNasDa" is an activist, hip hop artist and curator of African and Lakota heritage. YoNasDa, pronounced Yo-Naja-Ha, meaning “Precious Jewel”, is an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota Nation. "No Nation Can Rise Higher Than Its Woman," is a saying that breathes truth for Queen YoNasDa as she epitomizes this energy. YoNasDa is committed to continuing the work of her mother Wauneta Lone Wolf-Cox (1951 - 2003)

 

Published in Black Indian Truth

Sheilah Naajiibah Dasher is a young woman warrior with strength and fearlessness in her name. She is an experienced conference speaker, workshop facilitator and American Indian advocate. Naajiibah is a Navajo female warrior name, named for her great grandmother a herbalist medicine woman. Dasher wears her Native American Indian heritage proudly. Dasher is of mixed heritage from her Native American Indian mother and Black-American father. She is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation, but also honors her Zuni and Apache ancestral heritage.

Published in Black Indian Truth

 

Mahlikah Awe:ri, Enml'ga't-Saqama'sgw Walking Woman, is a 9th generation Afro-Native Canadian of Haudenosaunee Kanien’kéha, Mi’kmaw First Nations and African heritage from Nova Scotia, is a drumtalk-poetic-rapologist, musician, hip hop MC, arts educator, radio show host, artivist and curator based in Toronto, Canada.

 

Published in Black Indian Truth

"The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will" by William Loren Katz.  Adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition.

In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans -- considered unneeded inferior or criminal -- a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors of good will.

Published in 19th Century Memories

"From Above" (2013), is an award winning, myth-poetic feature film about two souls so deeply in love with one another that they are entangled beyond life itself.   (1 hr. 52 min.) Starring Danny Glover and Graham Green.

From his wife's deathbed, William Ward (Glover) dives under the gloomy waters of his memory to recall the love story of his life with Venus, a Native American beauty descended from the mystical Lightning Clan, a peculiar and "electric" Native family living in Arkansas.

Published in Arts & Entertainment

George Bonga, Ojibwe and African heritage (August 20, 1802 – 1880) was a fur trader who was one of the first Americans of African descent born in what is now Minnesota. He was born near Duluth, Minnesota. George was the son of Pierre Bonga (Jamaican?), and an Ojibwe (Anishinaabe) mother. George Bonga was well educated, as he attended school in Montreal and spoke English, French, and Ojibwe. He later became a fur trader and a wilderness guide. He was famous in Minnesota for being, as his brother Stephen claimed "One of the first two black children born in the state.". Due to his strength of character and talents, he was well known in the Lake Superior region.

Published in Black Indian Ancestors

Wilver Dornell "Willie" Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed "Pops" in the later years of his career was an American professional baseball player of African and Seminole Indian heritage. He played his entire 21-year Major League Baseball career as the left fielder and first baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1962-1982). Over his 21-year career with the Pirates, he batted .282, with 2,232 hits, 423 doubles, 475 home runs and 1540 runs batted in, helping his team capture six National League East division titles, two National League pennants and two World Series (1971, 1979).

Published in Black Indian Ancestors

Support The Groovalottos, A Soul-Funk Band of Black Indian Song Keepers

When selecting a core musical team for the 1st Gathering of the National Congress of Black American Indians, the leadership recognized the need for a group that understood the musical forms that embodied the blended traditions... blues, spirituals, funk and subsequently jazz and soul are Black Indians forms that a racist society has only credited to the Black American experience with no acknowledgement to Native contributions.

Published in Black Indian Truth

Mary Edmonia Lewis (July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was a talented American sculptor of African/Haitian and Ojibwe heritage. She is the first credited Black American Indian female sculptor in the U.S. Lewis who gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world. Lewis was inspired by the lives of abolitionists and Civil War heroes.

Published in Black Indian Ancestors

Written and Compiled by Sonya Braxton of Paper Genocide in America based on materials from "Slavery and Native Americans in British North America and the United States: 1600 to 1865" by Tony Seybert.

It is not known how many Indians were enslaved by the Europeans, but they certainly numbered in the tens of thousands. It is estimated that Carolina merchants operating out of Charles Town shipped an estimated 30,000 to 50,000 Indian captives between 1670 and 1715.

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LATEST STORIES OF AMERICAN HISTORY

Tuskegee Institute and Tuskegee Airmen, World War II

Tuskegee Institute and Tuskegee Airmen, World War II

Remembering the "Tuskegee Airmen" during World War II and all who were involved in the so-called "Tuskegee Experiment", the Army Air Corps program to train Black Americans to fly and maintain combat aircraft. The Tuskegee Airmen included pilots, navigators, bombardiers, maintenance and support staff, instructors, and all the personnel who kept the planes in the air. The military selected Tuskegee Institute ...

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Michelle Obama, First Black First Lady of United States

Michelle Obama, First Black First Lady of United States

Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama is an American lawyer and writer. She is the wife of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama, and the first acknowledged Black-American First Lady of the United States, (Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis descended from a family known as the van Salee's, who were described as "mulatto" in the 17th century). When people ask First Lady Michelle Obama to describe herself, she doesn...

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Lumbee Tribe Defeated KKK and Made History (1958)

Lumbee Tribe Defeated KKK and Made History (1958)

The Lumbee Tribe made history January 18, 1958 with the Battle of Hayes Pond.  This was the night the Lumbees defeated the KKK and captured their hate filled banner, and in doing so stopped Klan activity in Robeson County North Carolina. By the mid-1950's the Civil Rights Movement was gaining momentum and the KKK decided they had to fight back. Their campaign of terrorism swept through many of the southern states, but largely...

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Travesty of Justice: The Murder of Johnny Robinson

Travesty of Justice: The Murder of Johnny Robinson

Written and compiled by I Love Ancestry based on materials from npr.org  and  al.com Johnny Robinson Jr. who was 16 when he was killed, shot in the back by white police officer during the unrest following the infamous church bombing in Birmingham (memories/20st-century/item/229-birmingham-church-bombing-alabama-white-supremacist-klansmen-1963), Alabama on September 15, 1963. Racial violence broke out on the streets that after...

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Honoring John T. Williams, Forever in Our Memories

Honoring John T. Williams, Forever in Our Memories

Based on article from Indian Country Today Media Network "The Shooting Death of John T. Williams" by Fern Renville  John T. Williams, a First Nations master carver, was shot and killed by Officer Ian Birk of the Seattle Police Department on August 30, 2010 while carrying a small, legal folding knife that he used for carving. While the inquest found that the shooting was unjustified Birk remains a free man.

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Travesty of Justice: The Murder of Virgil Lamar Ware

Travesty of Justice: The Murder of Virgil Lamar Ware

Based on materials from Northeastern University School of Law, and Biography.com.    In the tense atmosphere that followed a deadly church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963, Thirteen year-old Virgil Lamar Ware  (Dec. 6, 1949 - Sept. 15, 1963) was murdered by two white teenagers without justice served.

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Birmingham Church Bombing By The Ku Klux Klan

Birmingham Church Bombing By The Ku Klux Klan

Written and compiled by I Love Ancestry based on materials from Wikipedia.   An unforgettable act of American Terrorism by white supremacist members of the Ku Klux Klan, "The Law in Disguise" for the Baptist Church Bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, September 15, 1963.

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The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will

"The First U.S. Foreign Ambassadors of Good Will" by William Loren Katz.  Adapted from Black Indians: A Hidden Heritage © Atheneum, 2012 revised edition. In 1803 when President Thomas Jefferson purchased the Louisiana Territory from France, he doubled the size of the new United States of America It also gave two Americans -- considered unneeded inferior or criminal -- a unique opportunity to serve as US ambassadors o...

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TRENDING STORIES OF AMERICAN HISTORY

Silent Film, All-Native Cast "The Daughter of Dawn"

Silent Film, All-Native Cast "The Daughter of Dawn"

Silent Film With All-Native Cast including Wanada Parker, daughter of Chief Quannah Parker. "The Daughter of Dawn" (1920), a silent film featuring an all-Native cast came to be made, lost seemingly forever, was discovered nearly a century l...

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Truth about Christopher Columbus by GrayWolf

Truth about Christopher Columbus by GrayWolf

"The Truth about Christopher Columbus" by GrayWolf. Many people are very much against Columbus having his own holiday. They feel Columbus Day should be abolished, and that his true history should be well exposed to the public. If you don'...

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Indian Boarding Schools: Assassination of a Culture

Indian Boarding Schools: Assassination of a Culture

"Sexual Trauma: One Legacy of the Boarding School Era" by Ruth Hopkins of LastRealIndians.com Anglo-American Cultural Terrorism “kill the Indian and save the man. Every American Indian alive today has been affected by the policy of assimil...

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